Corporate nonliquidating distributions problems

Posted by / 03-Dec-2020 11:40

Corporate nonliquidating distributions problems

The Internal Revenue Code uses four tests to make this distinction: To prevent gamesmanship among related parties, Congress has added another layer of rules that must be analyzed to determine if a distribution is a redemption.These attribution rules provide that shares owned by a shareholder’s parents, children, and grandchildren (but not siblings) are considered to be owned by the shareholder.[11] Similarly, shares held by corporations, trusts, and partnerships are deemed to be owned by their shareholders beneficiaries, and partners, and vice versa.[12] As a result, shares held by these family members and entities are considered to be owned by the shareholder for purposes of determining whether the distribution qualifies as a redemption.

If the property distributed is worth less than the amount of the liability itself, the FMV of the property is treated as no less than the amount of the liability (Sec. The assumption of a contingent or unknown liability is disregarded in determining the property’s FMV. A corporation, whether it uses the cash or accrual basis, may have earned income that it has not collected before the liquidation takes place.

But that section only covers gain on distributions of appreciated property.

If the corporation distributes property that has depreciated (i.e., property with a built-in loss), Code § 311(b) does not apply.

If the stock is a capital asset in the hands of the shareholder, the shareholder has a capital gain or loss on the exchange.

The maximum tax rate for both long-term capital gains (realized after May 5, 2003, and before 2013) and dividends (for tax years beginning after 2002 and before 2013) is 15%.

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A corporation will not recognize any gain or loss on a distribution of cash to its shareholders.[13] But if the corporation distributes appreciated property, the corporation must recognize gain as if the property were sold to the shareholder at fair market value.[14] Important Note: These two rules operate as a loss disallowance system.

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